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Friday, July 8, 2011

Quietest Fourth - July 9, 1921 - Colville, WA

Just scanned the Library of Congress website for interesting articles. I have a soft spot for small-town newspapers.

Colville Has Quietest Fourth

"The quietest fourth Colville ever had that I can remember," said G. B. Ide, idly stretching himself in his real estate office "And I have seen a good many in this town during my 37 years residence. As for myself, I went up to Mill creek and did some fishing."

"It was too quiet for me" stated Justice of the Peace J. H. King. "While I did not go any place outside of Colville, it seems most of the town wont to Chewelah to attend the celebration. I came down town once and then went back. Again later in the afternoon, I came down attain to see if there was anybody around but one look convinced me that the lakes, Chewelah and Inchelium had been the mecca for the most of Colville's citizens."

Most of Colville divided in spending the fourth. A small number stayed home. Part went to Inchelium to attend the regular Indian celebration being held at that place. But the largest part by far went to Chewelah where the Colville band and baseball team were the leading attractions.

Those who did not go to either of the above named places went to the different streams and lakes in the county on camping and fishing parties. County Engineer T. M. Onet (???) and his assistant Fred Thomas went out to the lakes but when the fish refused to bite they turned to other diversions.

"Home looked good to me, so good in fact that I spent the fourth there"
responded Justice A. L. Knapp when questioned as to his whereabouts.
"Speaking of quiet fourths, Colville had the quietest that I can remember," and Justice Knapp must be taken as an authority when the fact becomes known that he has lived in the vicinity for the past 32 years.

Led by the Colville band and augmented by fourteen members of the Frank Starr Post Noi. (sic?) 47 of the American Legion, the celebration at Chewelah easily attracted more people from Colville than any other single celebration. The Colville band was the only band of three advertised to appear that actually put in an appearance.

Much favorable comment was heard on all sides on the new cap adopted by the Frank Starr Post. The cap is modeled on the same pattern as the cap worn overseas by doughboys in the late war, and is blue with gold trimmings.

The individual features of the parade was the beautifully decorated automobile floats, with the comedy being furnished by the clowns. Eight former ex-sailors from Chewelah in their white uniforms also came in for their share of the attention. In the parade, the post flag of the Frank Starr Post was carried by Color Bearers Bob Lee and Abe Denson. Jack St. Clair and Warwick Stewart acted as color guards. John V. Folsom post of Chewelah also took part in the parade and later acted as host to the Colville post at a dinner.

The ball game in the afternoon between Chewelah and Colville attracted its share of the crowd attending the celebration. In the evening dancing was the chief form or (sic?) amusement offered. Numerous automobile parties made little side trips into the country.

--The Colville Examiner, July 9, 1921

I had no idea Colville even existed before this article...it seems to have a population around 5,000. Couldn't find any good sources but Wikipedia says there were less than 2,000 residents in 1920.

Interestingly, Chewelah is even smaller than Colville. Wikipedia (again, not the height of accuracy, but couldn't find any better in limited time) said Chewelah's population in 1920 was 1,600--pretty close to Colville's.

And to my surprise, Colville is about 23 miles away from Chewelah! I wonder if they had any transportation, or if everyone was just driving...

And an ad from JC Penney!



I love old clothes, of course. This might be noteworthy due to the early 1920s corset (not exactly an hourglass figure).



--The Colville Examiner, July 9, 1921

Now, JC Penney has over 1,100 stores.

2 comments:

  1. Joel and DeborahJuly 8, 2011 at 11:04 AM

    Colville and Chewelah both have a soft spot in my heart! They are both right in my neck of the woods. Love this...

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  2. Aaaaaaah, now I wish I were visiting the Northwest! (And not just because of the 110 degree heat here.)

    ReplyDelete